Bell Eapen

eHealth and Information System Research

Intelligent Federated Model of Health Information Exchange Clinical Viewers IFCV

I have blogged about federated search clinical viewers before. Essentially such viewers query source health information systems in real time and provide the user with a consolidated view. There is no data repository, ensuring data integrity and data privacy. Though the system can be slow because of the real-time search, there are many successful regional implementations of this type.

There is an obvious disadvantage for federated model of health information exchange viewers. Intelligence cannot be built into such viewers. Since there is no server side data storage, there is no scope for server side processing. The data comes together only in the rendered view. Some  mixed systems that have a data-repository provide some crude warning flags that are not-real time. But clinically useful alerts are beyond the capabilities of federated systems. So how do we build intelligent federated clinical viewers?

Intelligent Federated Clinical Viewer #IFCV

As HTML5 specifications mature, intelligence can be built into clinical viewers by client side processing and storage. Though local database storage implemented by Safari is too insecure at this stage for this purpose, it might become viable in the future. Some useful functionality can be built with the Session storage functionality that has been expanded to store up to 4MB of data depending on browser implementations. This is much more than the conventional cookie storage. The Sessions object persist only till the window is active and is reasonably secure. I have listed some typical use cases below.

A typical pharmacy module of a clinical viewer brings together all the medications the patient is on from all source hospitals. A client side script could identify drug interactions by analysing the view. This is beyond the local EHR system as disparate systems do not talk to each other.

If all the active drugs can be stored locally during the pharmacy module view, contraindications such as steroids in hyperglcemia can be alerted when the lab module is accessed. These intelligent alerts could be clinically invaluable.

The utopian dream of cross-communicating EHRs are still a long way in the future. Regional federated clinical viewers are going to rule the roost for some time. So intelligent federated clinical viewers may be worth a consideration. I don’t know whether this is already in the pipeline for vendors such as Mulesoft, Medseek or Mirth. If not, a link here (and a mail) will be highly appreciated when they do.

Twitter hashtag for this topic: #IFCV

Bring Your Own EMR (#BYOE)

The e-Health lessons from healthcare.gov debacle is being debated widely. The idea of applying large scale IT initiatives in clinical domains has its own risks. As we relentlessly move towards a fully digital healthcare ecosystem, is it possible to hide some of its complexities from the clinicians?

Patient empowerment is the buzzword in eHealth now and clinicians are generally viewed with some skepticism. EHealth has learnt over the years (in the hard way) that the clinicians may be reluctant to relinquish their firm grip on clinical data. After all they generated the data and they are the custodians though they do not own it!

One of the approaches worth trying is to give the clinicians control and freedom over their end of things. In other words, separate enterprise EMR from the physician EMR. However the key to success in this scenario is interoperability.

Interoperability of EMRs are being actively explored by many research teams and organizations. However the emphasis is on better standardization. As interoperability emerges as a global paradigm, the standardization strategy that has failed for the last decade or so, still seems impractical?

Bring Your Own EMR

I am working on an interoperability solution that segregates physician EMR solutions logically and physically from Enterprise EMR solutions. I would like to call this Bring Your Own EMR (#BYOEpronounced as ‘bio’. The general framework is shown above. If you would like to join the #BYOE initiative or give feedback, shoot me an email!!

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Bring Your Own EMR by Bellraj Eapen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at http://nuchange.ca/?p=21.

Please cite this page as: Eapen BR. Bring Your Own EMR (#BYOE) . Available from: http://nuchange.ca/?p=21