Bell Eapen

eHealth and Health Information System Consultant

Hephestus: Health data warehousing tool for public health and clinical research

Health data warehousing is becoming an important requirement for deriving knowledge from the vast amount of health data that healthcare organizations collect. A data warehouse is vital for collaborative and predictive analytics. The first step in designing a data warehouse is to decide on a suitable data model. This is followed by the extract-transform-load (ETL) process that converts source data to the new data model amenable for analytics.

The OHDSI – OMOP Common Data Model is one such data model that allows for the systematic analysis of disparate observational databases and EMRs. The data from diverse systems needs to be extracted, transformed and loaded on to a CDM database. Once a database has been converted to the OMOP CDM, evidence can be generated using standardized analytics tools that are already available.

Each data source requires customized ETL tools for this conversion from the source data to CDM. The OHDSI ecosystem has made some tools available for helping the ETL process such as the White Rabbit and the Rabbit In a Hat. However, health data warehousing process is still challenging because of the variability of source databases in terms of structure and implementations.

Hephestus is an open-source python tool for this ETL process organized into modules to allow code reuse between various ETL tools for open-source EMR systems and data sources. Hephestus uses SqlAlchemy for database connection and automapping tables to classes and bonobo for managing ETL. The ultimate aim is to develop a tool that can translate the report from the OHDSI tools into an ETL script with minimal intervention. This is a good python starter project for eHealth geeks.

Anyone anywhere in the world can build their own environment that can store patient-level observational health data, convert their data to OHDSI’s open community data standards (including the OMOP Common Data Model), run open-source analytics using the OHDSI toolkit, and collaborate in OHDSI research studies that advance our shared mission toward reliable evidence generation. Join the journey! here

Disclaimer: Hephestus is just my experiment and is not a part of the official OHDSI toolset.

  • SSH URL
  • Clone URL

LesionMapper: Pictographic lesion encoder for Dermatology

An electronic medical record example

An electronic medical record example (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Grading systems and novel methods of symptom coding is becoming more and more important with the growth of telehealth and electronic health records. It is probable that in dermatology too, a significant number of consultations will move online soon.

Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) is a commonly used tool for measuring subjective sensations such as itching. There is evidence showing that visual analogue scales have superior metrical characteristics than discrete scales, thus a wider range of statistical methods can be applied to the measurements.

Couple of months back, I attended a thesis defense in McMaster in which an innovative web based tool called Pain-QuILTTM for visual self-report of pain was presented. The technique of iconography – pictorial material relating to or illustrating a subject – was employed to represent pain using a flash based web-interface. Pain-QuILTTM tracks quality, intensity, location and temporal characteristics of the pain. Quality is represented by different icons, intensity is represented by a visual analogue scale of 1 -10, location by the position of icon on the body image and temporal characteristics by the time stamp. The clinical feasibility of Pain-QuILTTM has been successfully validated and published (1).
Pain-QuILTTM is a property of McMaster University and is subject to McMaster University’s terms of use. It can be accessed here

The iconographic symptom encoding could be applied easily to dermatology as well. Dermatology lesions are primarily visual and dermatological diagnosis to a great extend is based on the type, distribution, intensity and temporal characteristics of the skin lesions. However the representation may be challenging because of the diverse nature of lesions.

Recently I came across fabric.js a javascript library for image manipulation based on HTML5 canvas. Fabric.js was much more versatile and powerful than I expected. I could prototype  LesionMapperTM (that is what I want to call it), in less than 24 hours. The type of lesions are symbolized by representative clinical pictures instead of icons, intensity is represented by the opacity/translucency of the image and the location and distribution by the position and size of the lesion respectively, on the body image. The images can be dragged, enlarged or rotated. The icing on the cake is the ability of fabric.js to rasterize the image into a JSON that can be stored easily in a database.

Update: 14- June – 2016

LesionMapper is available as an OpenMRS module and OSCAR eForm. OpenMRS module is opensource and can be downloaded here. The github repository is available here. If you need the OSCAR eForm version, please contact me.

 

Ref:
1Lalloo, Chitra et al. “Pain-QuILT: Clinical Feasibility of a Web-Based Visual Pain Assessment Tool in Adults With Chronic Pain.” Journal of medical Internet research 16.5 (2014). [JMIR]