Bell Eapen

Physician | HealthIT Developer | Digital Health Consultant

Clinical Query Language – Part 1

Clinical Query Language (CQL) is a high-level query language to represent and generate unambiguous quality measures or clinical decision rules. I am not a CQL expert. These are my notes from a system development perspective. I am trying to make sense of this emerging concept and add my notes here in the hope that others may find this useful.

Clinical Query Language – Part 1
U.S. Navy photo by Chief Warrant Officer 4 Seth Rossman. / Public domain (wikimedia)

Clinical Query Language is designed to be intuitive for clinicians authoring the queries for quality measures and clinical decision support. The decision support rules are mostly alert type rules at the individual and population level that is calculated from a database (not usually diagnostic decision support). You can use any data model with CQL.

Here is an example segment of CQL:

define “InDemographic”:
AgeInYearsAt(start of MeasurementPeriod) >= 16 and AgeInYearsAt(start of MeasurementPeriod) < 24
and “Patient”.”gender” in “Female Administrative Sex”

As Clinical Query Language follows strict semantics, you can autogenerate lexers, parsers and visitors using ANTLR. In simple terms, CQL’s semantics can be represented as a ‘grammar’ that ANTLR can read and generate code to process any CQL in a variety of programming languages, including Java, Javascript, Python, C# and Go. The CQL grammar files are here: https://cql.hl7.org/08-a-cqlsyntax.html. Incidentally, CQL grammar inherits from fhirpath.

If you wish to generate code from these files, there are two things to note:

  • You need to rename CQL.g4 to cql.g4 as the library names are case sensitive and should correspond to the filename.
  • Put fhirpath.g4 in the same folder as cql.g4, and cql refers to fhirpath grammar.

Clinical Query Language aims to provide a high-level domain-independent language for clinicians that can be translated into low-level database logic. As CQL does not prescribe a data model, an intermediary format linking CQL to the data management logic is required. That is called Expression Logical Model (ELM) that we will discuss in part 2.

OHDSI OMOP to FHIR mapper

TL;DR Below is an open-source common-line tool for converting an OHDSI OMOP cohort (defined in ATLAS) to a FHIR bundle and vice versa.

Wikimedia commons: Copyright held by BAPS Swaminarayan Sanstha (web: www.baps.org, email: info@baps.org); Unknown photographer / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)

OHDSI OMOP CDM is one of the most popular clinical data models for health data warehouses. The simple, but clinically motivated data structure is intuitively appealing to clinicians leading to its good adoption. In this respect, it has overtaken HL7-V3 which is more robust but has a steeper learning curve, especially for clinicians. The OHDSI OMOP CDM is widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for drug monitoring.

FHIR is emerging as the defacto standard for health system interoperability, owing largely to its simplicity and the use of existing and popular standards such as REST. As NoSQL databases become more and popular in healthcare, FHIR can also be a good persistence schema. It aligns well with search technologies such as elasticsearch.

As both standards are popular, conversion from one to the other may be commonly required. Researchers at Georgia Tech have an open-source tool – GT-FHIR2 – for mapping an existing OHDSI OMOP CDM database as FHIR endpoint. However, conversion between existing systems may not be easy with a full-stack solution. 

I have a simpler solution that I believe will be useful in the following scenarios:

  • To export a cohort to a FHIR based analytics tool.
  • To load new resources to OMOP CDM databases for incremental ETL.

Omopfhirmap is a command-line tool for mapping a OHDSI cohort, defined in ATLAS, to a FHIR bundle that can be optionally submitted to a FHIR server for processing. Conversely, it can process a FHIR bundle and add resources to an existing CDM database ignoring duplicates. Unlike GT-FHIR2, the OMOP on FHIR Project at Georgia Tech omopfhirmap does not expose OMOP database as FHIR endpoints. 

I have used spring-boot and JPA for easy wiring of services and abstraction of database and the hapi-fhir as it is an obvious choice for any java based FHIR applications. It is still a work in progress and any help will be appreciated (Refer to CONTRBUTING.md).

FHIR and public health data warehouses

First posted on CanEHealth.com

The provincial government is building a connected health care system centred around patients, families and caregivers through the newly established OHTs. As disparate healthcare and public health teams move towards a unified structure, there is a growing need to reconsider our information system strategy. Most off the shelf solutions are pricey, while open-source solutions such as DHIS2 is not popular in Canada. Some of the public health units have existing systems, and it will be too resource-intensive to switch to another system. The interoperability challenge needs an innovative solution, beyond finding the single, provincial EMR.

artificial intelligence

We have written about the theoretical aspects, especially the need to envision public health information systems separate from an EMR. In this working paper, we propose a maturity model for PHIS and offer some pragmatic recommendations for dealing with the common challenges faced by public health teams. 

Below is a demo project on GitHub from the data-intel lab that showcases a potential solution for a scalable data warehouse for health information system integration. Public health databases are vital for the community for efficient planning, surveillance and effective interventions. Public health data needs to be integrated at various levels for effective policymaking. PHIS-DW adopts FHIR as the data model for storage with the integrated Elasticsearch stack. Kibana provides the visualization engine. PHIS-DW can support complex algorithms for disease surveillance such as machine learning methods, hidden Markov models, and Bayesian to multivariate analytics. PHIS-DW is work in progress and code contributions are welcome. We intend to use Bunsen to integrate PHIS-DW with Apache Spark for big data applications. 

FHIR has some advantages as a data persistence schema for public health. Apart from its popularity, the FHIR bundle makes it possible to send observations to FHIR servers without the associated patient resource, thereby ensuring reasonable privacy. This is especially useful in the surveillance of pandemics such as COVID19. Some useful yet complicated integrations with OSCAR EMR and DHIS2 is under consideration. If any of the OHTs find our approach interesting, give us a shout. 

BTW, have you seen Drishti, our framework for FHIR based behavioural intervention? 

Drishti: An mHealth platform for pervasive health monitoring

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